Tag Archives: cake

Lemon Rum Bundt Cake

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Lemon Butter Bundt CakeThis Lemon Rum Bundt Cake is a version of the beloved pound cake.  Easy to put together with a soaking syrup and no buttercream.

This is one of the best pound cakes I have ever eaten. The texture is like velvet on your tongue and the butter adds a flavor no other shortening can. Two flours are used. All purpose flour provides strength to achieve and hold its height. Cake flour tenderizes the crumb.

I find it interesting that there is no leavening except the air beaten into the butter and sugar.  Heavy cream adds to the melt in your mouth texture. Continue reading

Deep Butter Cake

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Deep Butter CakeDeep Butter Cake is a speciality of St. Louis – or at least it was.  Somewhere in the last ten or so years it seems to have disappeared from the cases of bakeries in my fair city.  I was reminded of it by a reader.  Marilyn was originally from St. Louis and remembers the city, and it’s bakery items, fondly.  She commented on a blog of mine and asked if I knew of a recipe for the Deep Butter Cake.

As you can imagine, that sent me on a hunt – which was short!.  While there are many listings for  the other St. Louis speciality – The Gooey Butter Cake, there are only two for the Deep Butter Cake.  The original recipe came from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch which ran the recipe from Helfer’s Bakery.  The only other mention I could find was from Olla Padrida who altered the recipe by doubling the crumb part. Continue reading

Orange Almond Teacake

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Orange Almond TeacakeThis Orange Almond Teacake is made from the same recipe as the Orange Almond Madeleines. In fact the madeleines. which we used as a petit four we thought of after we did the cake.  They are not only a wonderful addition to a petit four tray but can also be arranged as a flower for presentation.  Orange Almond Madelienes for Orange Almond Teacake

What makes this recipe a bit different from the original is the use of my almond paste in this Orange Almond Teacake.  A teacake is usually a simple, one layer, uniced cake.  While originally eaten with a cup of tea, coffee or nothing is fine in the states.  The almond paste in this cake keeps it moist for days.  The crumb of this cake is very close, not exactly dense but not exactly light either. Continue reading

Chocolate Strawberry Ruffle Cake

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Chocolate Strawberry Ruffle CakeThis Chocolate Strawberry Ruffle Cake  came about when a friend of mine was gathering items to auction off to help someone.  She wanted a spectacular, showstopper of a cake  cake that would draw a high bid.  I was happy to donate the cake.  I had made the cake, filled it and frozen it a week earlier. The day came to finish it and the night before she was to pick it up,  we lost all power – for 19 hours.  I couldn’t open the freezer or fridge until the power came back on.  So this Chocolate Strawberry Ruffle Cake never came to fruition for the auction.

This is another example of a cake made from recipes already on the blog.  One of the reasons I love baking and pastry is that it is infinitely changeable.  The chocolate cake is one of my base cakes that I use over and over in different versions. Continue reading

Why, When and How to Undercoat a Cake

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Bottom released for Why, When and How to Undercoat a CakeThere is no need to undercoat every cake.  But there are many than benefit from an undercoat.  Any cake that has a lot of crumbs on the outside edges has to have un undercoat so the crumbs are trapped in the undercoat and do not show through on the finished cake.

Typically, carrot cakes, banana cakes and others finished with a powdered sugar based frosting do not need an undercoat because the cakes do not crumb much and also because these types of frostings can be put on thick enough one step.  However, if  you have any question, always apply an undercoat.

While it is an extra step to undercoat, sometimes referred to as a crumb coat, the finished cake will be so much better looking.  This is particularly true for cakes finished with Italian or French buttercreams or a  ganache.  Ganache will follow the side of the cake very closely making for a rippled effect on the sides. Continue reading