Tag Archives: heavy cream

Lemon Rum Bundt Cake

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Lemon Butter Bundt CakeThis Lemon Rum Bundt Cake is a version of the beloved pound cake.  Easy to put together with a soaking syrup and no buttercream.

This is one of the best pound cakes I have ever eaten. The texture is like velvet on your tongue and the butter adds a flavor no other shortening can. Two flours are used. All purpose flour provides strength to achieve and hold its height. Cake flour tenderizes the crumb.

I find it interesting that there is no leavening except the air beaten into the butter and sugar.  Heavy cream adds to the melt in your mouth texture. Continue reading

Triple Chocolate Cheesecake

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Triple Chocolate CheesecakeOne of my readers asked if I had a chocolate version of the sour cream cheesecake.  This Triple Chocolate Cheesecake was our chocolate cheesecake for years.  It is indeed based upon the Sour Cream Cheesecake about which I blogged earlier. In fact, many of our cheesecakes started with this basic Sour Cream Cheesecake.

This is an unbelievably creamy, intensely chocolate cheesecake incorporating melted chocolate into the basic cheesecake.  While there is chocolate in the crust, the cheesecake itself and the glaze, they are balanced with the cream cheese, sour cream and cream for a very satisfying chocolate flavor without being overbearing.

As in the original recipe, I believe the food processor makes a better cheesecake than the mixer, but I include directions for both.  The most important issue with either method of making this chocolate cheesecake is to scrape down often.  If lumps of cream cheese go unincorporated they will mar the look of the finished chocolate cheesecake with white lumps showing.

I also am a firm believer in a two piece cheesecake pan with a removable bottom as opposed to a springform pan for several reasons.  First the sides are one piece and cannot warp or change shapes with time and use as can a springform pan.  Secondly, the bottom of a cheesecake pan is perfectly flat making it much easier to remove the cheesecake and transfer it to a round or a serving plate.  The cheesecake pan is raised at the outer edges and the plate itself is usually dimpled, neither of which aids in the removal.  Third, the spring in the spring form pan can loosen or give way after awhile making the pan useless.

The hardest thing about this Triple Chocolate Cheesecake is the overnight wait to finish it so it can be eaten.  This also freezes well as long as it is defrosted under a cover so the condensation doesn’t go to the top of the cake.  In any case this is a sublime dessert served alone or with a strawberry, raspberry or mixed berry compote.

Continue reading

Salvaging Over-Whipped Cream

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Soft Peak Cream is one of two by products of unhomogenized milk.  Allowed to sit, the cream rises to the top while the equivalant of skimmed milk goes to the bottom. On the market today are pasteurized and ultra pasteurized cream.  While the ultra pasteurized cream has a longer shelf life due to being heated to up to 300 degrees briefly, some feel it doesn’t whip as well.  I don’t think it tastes as fresh as pasteurized cream so we never used it.

There are a good number of different types of cream today.  They are classified by the amount of milk fat in them.  In descending order they are:
40%  or Heavy Cream – contains 40 percent milkfat
Whipping Cream – 30 to 36  percent milkfat
Light cream or coffee cream – between 18 ad 30 percent milk fat but is usually closer 20 percent.
Half and Half is a mixture of 1/2 milk and 1/2 cream.  We did not stock it at the bakery.  We simply made it by combining  cream and milk when we needed it.

Cream is highly perishable and needs to be refrigerated and used within the “use by” date.  We had a spell on several occasions at the bakery where the cream was spoiled before the date expired.  It became a practice for us to shake the cream, open it and smell it before we used it. Fortunately, our supplier always took back any cream that had turned. Continue reading