Tag Archives: pizza

International Flatbreads-An Easier Version of Pizza

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

International FlatbreadsThis International Flatbreads post started with my interest in exploring 00 flour. The recipe I chose to work with was for a pizza dough from Roberta’s restaurant in New York. The recipe came from the New York Times.

I suggest you get a cup of coffee, tea or whatever you drink, find a comfy chair and get ready to read this rather lengthy blog.

Pizza my way is something I really love to make. It is simple and satisfying. But more than pizza I love flatbreads. The lack of a sauce allows the ingredients to come through with a power they can’t otherwise.

Anyway, back to the flour. The recipe calls for 00 flour, which has recently become the new darling of the flour world. So I went to my Italian grocer and bought a bag. I found the flour to be incredibly smooth and fine. I loved the feel and texture of it. Continue reading

Peach Pizza

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Slice on trivetWhen I told Mike (my husband) that this week’s blog was Peach Pizza, he was visibly skeptical. And that is really unusual.  He normally eats anything I make and tells me it’s good.  Undaunted, we started the photography.  It didn’t get any better.  I could see the confusion on Mike’s face.  Granted peach pizza isn’t something you run across in pizza shops but with peaches hitting their stride, this is the perfect time to try something new with this not too sweet dessert.  While you want the peaches to be ripe, you don’t want them too soft or they will turn to mush when you poach them.

The crust for this pizza is the best of all possible crusts – the French all butter Pate Brisee a L’oeuf which is unequalled in taste.  The combination of flours emulates pastry flour which is more tender than all purpose alone. The egg yolk strengthens the pastry while the lemon juice adds crispness and color.  Ice cold water is important and I generally fill a measuring cup with ice and add water while I prep the other ingredients.  It is easy to measure from the cup. However, a friend of mine just gave me a great tip. Put the water and ice cubes in a gravy separator and the ice stays behind when you pour out the water. (Thanks, Hilda.)  To see  if the dough will come together, take a bit between your fingers and squeeze it together.  If it stays together and doesn’t feel dry, it is done.  Otherwise, add water a teaspoon or so at a time. Normally a very flaky crust, here it is weighted down to keep if from rising too much and over powering the filling. Continue reading