Tag Archives: yeast dough

Fresh as a Daisy Doughnuts

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2013. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY T. MIKE FLETCHER, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Finished photoDoughnuts have always seemed to be an ethereal food – out of reach of most of us.  But nothing could be further from the truth!  In reality they take about 20 minutes to mix up, after which they rise, unattended and then sit contentedly in the refrigerator overnight. After a quick roll out the next day they are on their way to the last rise before being fried to a golden brown.  Between the two days you have 45 minutes invested for the treat of a lifetime because if you have never had a homemade doughnut, you have not had a real doughnut.

Yeast doughs have an undeserved reputation of being difficult.  I know people who will tackle the most complicated recipe but won’t go near a yeast dough. I’m not sure where that comes from.  Yeast doughs are extremely forgiving.  This recipe is tailored to making yeast dough easy.  The mashed potato flakes give the yeast something to eat for a light, high rise and a longer shelf life.  The honey adds color and flavor to the finished item also adding to their shelf life.

The dough can be shaped after it’s first rise but it is easier to do after chilling overnight or up to 2 or 3 days.  Just make sure it is tightly covered.  It may rise again when refrigerated, just punch it down, cover well and forget about it. These would make an ideal treat on a weekend.  Start them on Friday or Saturday and have them for breakfast on Sunday.

There are several types of yeast.  Little cakes of fresh yeast are very difficult to come by these days and have a short shelf life.  Instant yeast and rapid rise both come in envelopes, three to a pack.  I call for instant yeast in this recipe.  The flour used is bread flour that has the strength to support a high rise.  All purpose flour will do in a pinch although bread flour is readily available in most areas and is best for yeast breads.  The dough will rise the first time in about 1 1/2 to 2 hours depending upon the temperature of the room. Continue reading

Chocolate Cherry Bread

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2013. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY T. MIKE FLETCHER, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Chocolate Cherry BreadChocolate Cherry Bread combines two foods I love – chocolate and bread. So combining them seemed a natural. I can’t remember when I first tasted Chocolate Cherry Bread but it is among my favorite breads.  Besides how can cocoa, melted chocolate and chocolate chunks all in one bread be anything by super.

Cocoa is a natural and here I have combined it with melted chocolate and chocolate chunks for the greatet depth of chocolate flavor.

This Chocolate Cherry Bread freezes well and is great as a hostess gift. This bread, because of the chocolate in it, can be a slow riser and I often use my proofer to help it along. Try this once and I can assure you fear of bread baking will be in the past – at least I hope so. Continue reading

Hot Cross Buns

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2013. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY T. MIKE FLETCHER, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Finished PhotoHot Cross Buns are traditionally made during Lent.  Full of spices and raisins with a cross on top of the rolls, they are eagerly awaited during the year.  Hot cross buns are a welcome and tasty staple of Lent.   According to Wikipedia: “English folklore includes many superstitions surrounding hot cross buns. One of them says that buns baked and served on Good Friday will not spoil or mold during the subsequent year.”  Well, in my house they won’t last that long!

If you’ve never baked with a product by Sun-Maid called bakers raisins, you’ve missed the perfect raisin for baking.  They are moist and plump and don’t need any soaking to use.  A friend of mine introduced me a few years ago and I have been a fan every since.  I have included instructions for regular raisins that should be soaked to plump them before using in the Hot Cross Buns.   Continue reading

Lemon Gooey Butter Cake in a Brioche Crust

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2013. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY T. MIKE FLETCHER, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

SliceGooey butter cakes are a specialty of St. Louis.  Lemon Gooey Butter Cake in a Brioche Crust takes this homey cake into another realm.  The original gooey butter featured a yeast raised crust.  It was later changed to a yellow cake by some.  I  have skirted the issue by using a rich brioche dough that is so easy to make you won’t believe it.  I came up with this method years ago and it was featured on the cover and in a 10 page article in Bon Appetit magazine where it was used in 12 recipes I developed.  It is also one of the chapters in my first book, The New Pastry Cook.  The name 60 Second Brioche comes from the fact it takes about that long to mix  in a food processor.

Because the dough is very rich in eggs and butter, a starter is used to multiple the number of yeast cells available to the finished dough.  See Yeast as it Relates to Bread.

Gooey butter cakes are very rich. This Lemon Gooey Butter Cake is no exception.  To help cut the sweetness of the filling I have paired it with a lemon curd.  The curd cannot be made in a smaller amount so only half of it is used.

To make this Lemon Gooey Butter cake an even more remarkable dessert or coffeecake, it can be made in its entirety and frozen.  Thaw it in the refrigerator overnight, then briefly heat it in a 350 degree oven for 10 to 15 minutes just to take the chill off.

I have included instructions for making the brioche in a mixer if there is no processor available. Continue reading