Tag Archives: dessert sauce

Orange Bread Pudding

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Orange Bread PuddingOrange Bread Pudding with Orange Cream Sauce is the type of dessert I once joked about.  I was going to write a book named, “363 Bread Puddings and 252 Crème Brulees” because almost every restaurant in business serves these two desserts. But none of them comes close to this different take on everyone’s favorite dessert.

While technically any bread can be used, Challah or Brioche are my breads of choice for this bread pudding. Challah is the Jewish Bread rich in egg and braided.  It’s very close to Brioche.   Pecans and raisins work well with the orange flavor of the bread pudding. The Orange Cream Sauce accentuates the orange flavor while adding the perfect balance between sweet and tart. Continue reading

Crème Anglaise – A Classic Dessert Sauce

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Finished 2

Well, Crème Anglaise has certainly been an interesting trip through the internet as well as books (remember those?).  While everyone seems to agree that this “English Cream” or custard sauce contains some kind of cream or milk, egg yolks, sugar and flavoring – no one seems to agree on the amounts.

Custards, including crème brulee are nothing more than variations of the amount of ingredients used in crème anglaise.  While custards are baked in an oven with a water bath to prevent curdling, crème anglaise is referred to as a stirred custard and is cooked on top of the stove.  A water bath may be used here also to prevent overcooking. Continue reading

Caramel – An Important Building Block of Pastry

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Finished Caramel (1 of 1)Caramel is one of the basic building blocks of pastry – also known as component parts or foundations.  It can be used as a part of a recipe, as a sauce or a candy.  There are several ways of making caramel.  The simplest is to liquify sugar until deeply golden then add cream.  But taking a different route offers a deeper, richer caramel.

We used a lot of caramel at the shop and never found a smooth, buttery caramel that tasted as good and was the correct consistency without making our own.   So we did!  Sometimes there was so much caramel going, you would think we were a candy shop instead of a bakery.  If you are not using the caramel immediately, it will keep well at room temperature when it is cool. Refrigerate it if the weather is warm or the butter will separate.  To warm it for spreading, microwave briefly.  Do not overheat or over stir a lot, as the butter will separate and rise to the top.  If this happens, pour off the melted butter.  For any recipe calling for caramel, you can do as we did and make this several days in advance.  Warm to use.

Once you taste this caramel, it will spoil any other caramel for you.  To use it for a sauce after it has been made, place it in a saucepan and add a bit more cream.  Heat gently, stirring from time to time.  If it is too thick, add a bit more cream. Remember the caramel sauce will thicken at room temperature so make it a bit thinner than you want the finished sauce to be when cooled. Continue reading

27 Layer Tuile Torte

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Finished Whole, CutA variation of this magnificently layered Tuile Torte appeared in my first book, “The New Pastry Cook”.  It  is actually easy to make but it is time consuming. The fact that most of it can be done ahead makes it very possible.  Fourteen layers of tuile and 13 layers of mousse are a show stopper any way you look at it.  There is another view of a slice of the torte in the slide show above on my banner.

A series of tulle layers made on the bottom of an upside down 9″ round cake pan is the time consuming part.  How fast it goes depends upon how many pans you have and how fast you can spread the batter.

When I first went into business, there was one caterer who loved this so much, he served it at every upscale party they had.  When I had to make 20 of them, I pulled this from the list of available desserts.  I heard about it to the day I closed.  But 280 layers isn’t fast no matter how many pans you have or how fast  you are. Continue reading

Creamy Pound Cake with Strawberry Lemon Sauce

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Finished photoMany years ago a friend of mine gave me the recipe for this Creamy Pound Cake.  I remember thinking this couldn’t possibly work – as bakers we have been trained to preheat the oven.  This started in a cold oven. But because she was such a good cook I decided to give it a try exactly as it was given to me.  Wow! was I wrong!  This is a fantastic, easy pound cake.  The only caveat is to make sure the butter is really soft or it won’t blend together with the large amount of sugar.  I find it fascinating that is rises as it does without the benefit of any kind of leavening which is why it is important beat a lot of air into the butter/sugar.  It is a dense cake, as pound cakes are, but it has a moistness and flavor that is incomparable.  It literally lasts for days under a cake cover and freezes well.

Everyone I know who has made this has sworn by it and like me, finds the recipe fascinating.  In fact, the reputation of this pound cake is so great,  I was asked by a local magazine for the recipe to use in their yearly cookbook.

Every time I make this I think of my friend, now gone, and what a wonderful gift she gave me. Continue reading