Tag Archives: wedding cakes

Individual Wedding Cakes

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Mini Wedding CakeThese amazing individual wedding cakes are so much easier and elegant than the smaller ones that are covered in buttercream or fondant. Most individual wedding cakes are so small they consist mostly of buttercream and/or fondant.

I designed and my bakery produced about 175 of these little wedding cakes for a luncheon involving the media, wedding planners, florists and others associated in producing weddings.  We did this white cake filled with raspberry buttercream and a chocolate cake filled with chocolate ganache.  To say they were a hit was an understatement.  There are any number of combinations of these two cakes and filings that can be used.

I am including the chocolate cake layer recipe also so you can make a chocolate version of the individual wedding cakes.

I found this petit four cake layer a very long time ago in a newsletter about chocolate.  It is the perfect layer for a petit four.  It stays perfectly flat and tastes wonderful.  It also cuts beautifully without crumbs when cold but should be served at room temperature.  These three layer cakes are nothing more than unfinished petit fours cut in 1,2 and 3 inch squares that are stacked together.  You can see at this point just how doable these miniature wedding cakes become. Continue reading

Sharing Baking Tips

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.
Miniature Wedding Cakes

Miniature Wedding Cakes by Truffes,Inc.

With the start of the new year, I like to take a few days off to plan the upcoming year.  Actually, I have been doing this for several weeks, but a few days of leisure helps me put it all into prospective.

I have an ambitious plan for the year – I’ll see how much I get into practice.  In addition to this blog, I blog for a local magazine, appear regularly on TV and am the pastry chef for Tony’s – the most acclaimed restaurant in St. Louis.  In fact, I am very proud that we have recently been named one of America’s top 100 restaurants.

But I digress.  To give you something to think about while I ruminate , I’ve collected some sites that offer baking tips I think would interest you.  Please disregard the pan preparation tips they give and stick to the Cake Pan Prep for Flat Cake Layers here.  These have been selected as  each baking tip has something to say the others didn’t so there isn’t a lot of repetition.

If you have a particular baking tip you would like to share, please post it in the comment section.  I know we would all love to hear them.

I wish for all of you  the very best in  2014 and that it will be your best year yet!  Baking and otherwise!

http://sweetapolita.com/2010/11/50-tips-for-baking-better-cakes/ – This is an ambitious 50 tips for baking better cakes.

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Cake/bakingtips.htm – Nice collection of basic baking rules.

http://allrecipes.com/howto/top-10-cookie-baking-tips/ – Especially for cookie makers.  This has some useful cookie tips.

http://southernfood.about.com/od/cakerecipes/a/cake_tips.htm – Some useful information not addressed by others

http://www.cookinglight.com/cooking-101/techniques/cake-baking-00412000067467/page12.html – I like Cooking Light magazine because they are the only consumer magazine that gets baking.  They use scales, and other good baking techniques and write their recipes with weights.  They have a particularly good tip, “How to factor in Higher Altitude.  Although I don’t live in a high altitude area, I learned what to do if I did.  For those of you who do, you will find this particularly interesting and helpful.  It is their number 10 tip out of 10.  All are interesting however.

http://sherisilver.com/2011/03/03/baking-basics-my-top-ten-tips-and-tricks/- I  found two tips here that bear mentioning.

“10. I came across this muffin/cupcake do-ahead tip over 20 years ago and it is, hands down, my favorite: line your tins with foil cups. Follow the recipe, fill the tins and place the unbaked muffins in the freezer. When frozen, pop them out and store in ziploc bags. Note the item, oven temp and baking time (as well as the date) on the bag. You can now make as few or many freshly baked muffins as you like – a lovely treat on a weekend morning or after school. Pre-heat the oven according to the recipe, place the frozen muffins in the tins and bake for 10-15 minutes longer than suggested. As in tip #9, fill the empty cups half-way with water to ensure even heating.

9. One of my favorite baking tools is my mini-loaf rack. Often, a pound cake or tea bread recipe is more than I need for the occasion – a friend coming for tea or a thank you for a neighbor. Here’s an easy conversion that yields several small loaves for the price of one: a recipe calling for a 9×5 loaf pan will yield 3 mini loaves, and one using an 8×4 pan will yield 2. If you are not filling all the pans on the rack, fill the empty pans halfway with water to ensure even heating all around. These mini loaves freeze well and are so nice to have at the ready.”

I also like King Arthur Flours site, http://www.kingarthurflour.com  but they push their products so aggressively and suggest adding products they sell to recipes that I don’t think are necessary for home bakers to achieve excellent results.

French Buttercream

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Brown and White CakeFrench buttercream is distinguished by the use of egg yolks as well as whites.  A sugar syrup is used and it is flavored with vanilla or other flavors of your choice.  The combination of egg yolks and egg whites will whip into a foam that does not need to be stabilized as do egg whites alone.

This buttercream is the last of the European buttercreams based on an emulsion.  This is considered to be the most stable of all of them as it uses whole eggs and  yolks not a meringue as do the Swiss and Italian.   Although this is not as light as the Swiss and Italian, it is by no means heavy.  We are talking degrees here.   I think this buttercream has a richer, deeper taste due to the added richness of the yolks.

If  you research this along with the other two you will find varying amounts of the eggs, yolks and whites (for the Swiss and Italian) along with varying amounts of sugar and butter. There doesn’t seem to be a definitive recipe as long as the proportions are correct.  The French buttercream requires a hot sugar syrup as does the Italian.  However, because whole eggs and yolks are being used, they do not need to be stabilized as do egg whites alone.  Just beating them will obtain the desired effect.

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