Tag Archives: no machine ice cream

Ultimate Hot Fudge Marshmallow Sundae

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Ultimate Hot Fudge Marshmallow SundaeThe Ultimate Hot Fudge Marshmallow Sundae is the result of last week’s blog on the Double Chocolate No Machine Ice Cream.  Several readers questioned what to do with the leftover condensed milk.  A 14 ounce can of condensed milk is measured by weight and contains 1 1/4 cups of milk.   Using 1/2 cup in the ice cream leaves 3/4 cup left over.  What to do with it?

So here is the post from my original blog, The Ardent Cook.  It has the ice cream from last week as well as hot fudge sauce and homemade marshmallow creme making it the Ultimate Hot Fudge Marshmallow Sundae.

Updating this blog is the use of the last 3/4 cup of condensed milk in the hot fudge sauce.  I am leaving both hot fudge sauces in the blog because truthfully, I prefer my original because I think it has a deeper flavor.  However, this recipe, from Eagle Brand Condensed Milk was scaled down to use the leftover condensed milk. Continue reading

Bananas Foster Ice Cream

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Bananas Foster Ice CreamThis Bananas Foster Ice Cream is a variation of that marvelous no machine ice cream featuring condensed milk and whipped cream. It also features very little work!

An added ingredient, rum, keeps the ice cream from freezing rock hard and insures it stays nice and creamy for up to a couple of weeks (if it lasts that log) in the freezer.

Bananas Foster is made with brown sugar which is simply white sugar coated with molasses. Less for light, more for dark. Since this recipe does not use sugar, I added a bit of molasses to emulate the flavor of the brown sugar. Rum is used, not only to keep the ice cream from freezing, but as one of the flavors of Bananas Foster. Continue reading

Meringue Shells

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Finished 4One of the easiest and most versatile dessert shell is the Meringue Shell. Only three ingredients, egg whites, sugar and an acid along with  a bit of time in a low oven transforms these simple components into feather light, melt in your mouth containers for almost anything you want to put in them.

From Schaum Tortes of Vienna filled with a lightened lemon curd to ice cream balls, and the national dessert of New Zealand and Australia, Pavolova, these Meringue Shells make the perfect do ahead dessert. I remember well when I was young my mother making Schaum Torte on special occasions. She would make a large nine or ten inch shell and fill it with the most delicious lemon filling. I was always first in line for a piece. Well, one year my uncle came to our house to help transfer the mountain of food my mother made including the Schaum Torte, croissant and other treats to our grandmothers where we al ate. As he stepped off the curb, he slipped and while he remained upright, alas, the lemon filled treat fell from his hands into the curb. I don’t think he ever got over it. I’m sure my mother didn’t. I know for sure I didn’t.

There are many types of meringue from the soft pillows that cover a lemon meringue pie to buttercreams based on various meringues to crisp cookies or shells. The type of meringue depends upon the amount of sugar used. For a crisp meringue a two to one proportion of egg whites to sugar is used. For these crisp shells a base formula of 1 egg white to 1/4 cup (50 grams or 1 2/3 ounces) of sugar is used. An acid such as 1/2 teaspon cream of tarter or 1 teaspoon of lemon juice or vinegar helps stabalize the meringue. Continue reading