Tag Archives: goat cheese

Savory Tarts – Summers Bounty

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

French Onion TartThese Savory Tarts are cousins of the sweet variety and feature summers bounty as it comes into season. There are few foods as delicious as homegrown tomatoes that are in stores now.

Both of these Savory Tarts feature basil.  It is my very most favorite herb and it seems made for summer. The important thing when using fresh herbs in baked products is to bury them under the top of the dish. Many recipes call for chopping the basil and sprinkling it on top of the dish then baking it.  Doing this just dries the herb so there’s no reason to use fresh herbs.  But by chopping it and putting it in the recipe, not on top, it retains the flavor of fresh basil.

These are two Savory Tarts are my favorites and were popular at the take out shop.  Since they can be made ahead, they are perfect for brunch, lunch or dinner.

French Onion TartFrench Onion Tart

Go here for the original recipe.  This tart features the sweetness of caramelized onions, ripe tomatoes, calamata olives, basil, and Gruyere cheese in a yeast crust.   The crust can be made up to 3 days ahead if desired. Go low and slow when caramelizing the onions so they attain a deep brown but are not burned.  Stir often, especially as they start to reach the desired color.

Goat Cheese TartGoat Cheese Pesto Tart

Go here for the original recipe. This savory tart features an asiago cheese crust which is filled with roasted red and yellow peppers and topped with a goat cheese filling that includes cream cheese and basil pesto.  This is a perfect summer brunch, lunch or dinner entre.

Goat Cheese Pesto Tart

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Finished PhotAt the retail shop, the clientele loved this Goat Cheese Pesto Tart.  It is the perfect example of a savory tart and we did many of them.  This Goat Cheese Pesto Tart came from my love of peppers and basil – in this case,  pesto. While I appreciate goat cheese, I find it very astringent and usually cut it with cream cheese to mellow it out as I have done here.  I used this filling for small crostadas which we used as appetizers. We crossed slivers of red and yellow pepper on the top and they made a dazzling display on a tray when passed.  They can be made, as can the tart, ahead and frozen.

For the crostadas, I would freeze them without the peppers on top, adding them after they had been reheated.  I particularly like to use this filling for the crostadas as it didn’t lose its shape when heated.  We would pipe it on with a large star tip. Continue reading

Peach Pizza

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Slice on trivetWhen I told Mike (my husband) that this week’s blog was Peach Pizza, he was visibly skeptical. And that is really unusual.  He normally eats anything I make and tells me it’s good.  Undaunted, we started the photography.  It didn’t get any better.  I could see the confusion on Mike’s face.  Granted peach pizza isn’t something you run across in pizza shops but with peaches hitting their stride, this is the perfect time to try something new with this not too sweet dessert.  While you want the peaches to be ripe, you don’t want them too soft or they will turn to mush when you poach them.

The crust for this pizza is the best of all possible crusts – the French all butter Pate Brisee a L’oeuf which is unequalled in taste.  The combination of flours emulates pastry flour which is more tender than all purpose alone. The egg yolk strengthens the pastry while the lemon juice adds crispness and color.  Ice cold water is important and I generally fill a measuring cup with ice and add water while I prep the other ingredients.  It is easy to measure from the cup. However, a friend of mine just gave me a great tip. Put the water and ice cubes in a gravy separator and the ice stays behind when you pour out the water. (Thanks, Hilda.)  To see  if the dough will come together, take a bit between your fingers and squeeze it together.  If it stays together and doesn’t feel dry, it is done.  Otherwise, add water a teaspoon or so at a time. Normally a very flaky crust, here it is weighted down to keep if from rising too much and over powering the filling. Continue reading