Tag Archives: yeast dough

Brandied Chocolate Cherry Almond Garmisch

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Brandied Chocolate Cherry Almond GarmischGarmisch is another wonderful yeasted coffeecake as only the Germans can make them. Superb bakers, their products not only look beautiful but are luxurious tasting.

This yeast dough is really easy to put together and even if you have been slow to come to yeasted doughs this is a great place to start. It is a firmer dough that handles easily. It can be made ahead and refrigerated for several days before shaping and after baking, it freezes to be eaten another day – maybe as a special treat on New Years Day morning.

This Garmisch dough comes from a recipe that is so old I can’t remember where I got it. The dough itself is not sweet. The sweetness of the Garmisch comes from the filling. The original filling was walnuts and while delicious, the chocolate cherry almond filling adds a note of excitement. Dried bing cherries are soaked in brandy. Almond paste, a European favorite combines exquisitely with the cherries and brandy. The processor makes quick work of combining the ingredients into a filling with the egg white used to bind the filling. Continue reading

Stuffed (or Not) Kouign Amann

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Kouign Amann

One of the best descriptions I’ve read of Kouign Amann comes from Chef Steps:  “These salty, buttery pastries hail from the coastal region of Brittany, in the northwest corner of France, where Celtic Breton tradition has prevailed since the great migration across the English Channel during the fifth and sixth centuries. It looks just like you might imagine a Celtic colony on the seacoast of France would: towering bluffs dropping straight into the sea; tiny stone houses dotting the emerald countryside; slate-colored steeples rising into the morning mist. The region is best known for its vast salt flats, where the coveted finishing salt, fleur de sel, is harvested. Here, tucked into wandering village streets, bakeries hawk this much-lauded pastry treasure, whose name literally means “butter cake” in Breton.”

Kouign Amann (pronounced Queen-ah-mann) belongs to the laminated dough family in baking. A croissant like yeast dough is layered with butter and coated with sugar to produce a crunchy, sweet, caramelized pastry that some say is a breakfast pastry and some say is dessert. I could eat them all day long and not care a wit about what time it is! Continue reading

Stuffed Focaccia

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

stuffed-focaccia.jpegStuffed Focaccia takes a bread favorite one notch  higher.  I came late to “The Great British Bakeoff” and have always been sorry for that. Unlike American baking shows that seem to care only about the glitz, this is actually a baking show. Anyway, when I finally arrived I loved it to the point I purchased a book from one of the shows.

This Stuffed Focaccia is from, “The Great British Bake Off Big Book of Baking”. As usual I have altered it somewhat, most notably the filling. Mike absolutely loves it. Continue reading

Kifle with Walnut Filling

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

KifleKifle with Walnut Filling is a childhood memory. Mother would make them and I would wait with great anticipation for the time I could eat them. Kifle can be used with a sweet or savory filling. Just omit the sugar for the savory version and use a filling that isn’t wet.

Mother never made a savory version, only the sweet version. However, she would change the filling. She would use a poppy seed version or fill them with lekvar or prune filling, but the Kifle with Walnut Filling was my favorite. Often labeled a cookie, these are actually a pastry. Fleishmann’s Yeast has a Walnut Kifle and has this to say about them; ” Kifle is popular throughout Eastern Europe and the countries of the former Yugoslavia. This recipe makes a sweet nut-filled butterhorn pastry but kifle may also be left unsweetened and served as a savory sandwich roll. ” Continue reading

Fresh as a Daisy Doughnuts

BY HELEN S. FLETCHER, ON
COPYRIGHT, HELEN S. FLETCHER, 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ALL PHOTOS BY PASTRIES LIKE A PRO UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Finished photoDoughnuts have always seemed to be an ethereal food – out of reach of most of us.  But nothing could be further from the truth!  In reality they take about 20 minutes to mix up, after which they rise, unattended and then sit contentedly in the refrigerator overnight. After a quick roll out the next day they are on their way to the last rise before being fried to a golden brown.  Between the two days you have 45 minutes invested for the treat of a lifetime because if you have never had a homemade doughnut, you have not had a real doughnut.

Yeast doughs have an undeserved reputation of being difficult.  I know people who will tackle the most complicated recipe but won’t go near a yeast dough. I’m not sure where that comes from.  Yeast doughs are extremely forgiving.  This recipe is tailored to making yeast dough easy.  The mashed potato flakes give the yeast something to eat for a light, high rise and a longer shelf life.  The honey adds color and flavor to the finished item also adding to their shelf life.

The dough can be shaped after it’s first rise but it is easier to do after chilling overnight or up to 2 or 3 days.  Just make sure it is tightly covered.  It may rise again when refrigerated, just punch it down, cover well and forget about it. These would make an ideal treat on a weekend.  Start them on Friday or Saturday and have them for breakfast on Sunday.

There are several types of yeast.  Little cakes of fresh yeast are very difficult to come by these days and have a short shelf life.  Instant yeast and rapid rise both come in envelopes, three to a pack.  I call for instant yeast in this recipe.  The flour used is bread flour that has the strength to support a high rise.  All purpose flour will do in a pinch although bread flour is readily available in most areas and is best for yeast breads.  The dough will rise the first time in about 1 1/2 to 2 hours depending upon the temperature of the room. Continue reading